Pediatric Developmental Milestones

Guidance from Rochester’s Leading Pediatricians

The most important time in a child’s life to develop these motor and sensory skills is within the first three years of age. Research has shown that during these years, there are critical periods for children to develop very specific skills, and if those periods pass without development or exposure to those skills, being able to effectively learn later on is much harder.

While every child varies in their development, there is definitely a natural progression of development. If you have any questions about your child’s development, please contact your pediatrician at Westside Pediatric Group by calling (585) 247-5400.

Developmental Checklist

  • Begins to imitate sounds
  • Becomes interested in sounds and turn head towards them
  • Creates a tight grasp with fingers, usually able to hold toy with one hand
  • Brings hand to mouth
  • Sit with support

  • Able to bring food or drink to mouth with little assistance
  • Claps hands and wave “bye/hello”
  • Understands requests
  • Can focus on a toy/images for 2 minutes or more
  • Can begin using and understanding a few words

  • Makes short sentences
  • Can walk/run without help
  • Walks up stairs with some assistance
  • Can create marks with writing utensil
  • Begins to drink from a cup/eat with a spoon

  • Throw/kick a ball with good balance
  • Name objects with clear speech
  • Can turn multiple pages in a book
  • Feeds self with spoon and fork
  • Jump forward and down

  • Ask and answer questions
  • Ride a tricycle or other toy with wheels
  • Begins to play with imagination (pretend play)
  • Begins to become potty trained
  • Can identify at least 2 body parts
  • Draws vertical line or circle
  • Can remove a screw lid from bottle
  • Walk in a straight line

  • Make longer sentences and describe things while understanding basic grammar
  • Can attempt to unbutton, zip, snap, etc.
  • Color mostly in lines
  • Can cut paper fairly evenly
  • Fully potty trained
  • Can follow a series of directions at once
  • Can understanding sharing and taking turns
  • Can hop on one foot

  • Likes words and silly sounds—he knows many words…
  • Imitates adult activities—has a good imagination…
  • May have imaginary friends and an active fantasy life…
  • Wants to play with children his age…
  • Is better, able to share, take turns, accept rules …
  • Cannot differentiate well between fantasy and reality…
  • Recalls part of a story…
  • Draws circles and squares…
  • Draws a person with two to four body parts…

  • Can dress and undress himself…
  • Can count to ten or more…
  • Better understands the concept of time…
  • Likes to wash & personally care for himself…
  • Sometimes he is demanding…
  • Sometimes eagerly cooperative…
  • May still need a nap at the end of the day…
  • May wet the bed at night…
  • Likes to shock adults with bathroom language…
  • May have eye-hand coordination problems…
  • Far-sightedness is common

  • Can dress and undress himself…
  • Is very active, always on the go…
  • Knows the difference between sexes…
  • May ask questions about where babies come from…
  • Shows a fear of the dark, dogs, or bodily harm— Although this is not a
  • fearful age…
  • Likes to please adults and be good…
  • May tell lies or blame other for wrong doings because he wants to please and do right…

Schedule an Appointment

If you have more questions regarding your child’s development, call our pediatric office in Rochester, NY at (585) 247-5400 to request an appointment with one of our exceptional pediatricians.